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Reflections in Imladris by Starfox General Audiences
Companion Piece to Musings In The Night. Legolas arrives in Imladris.
The Black Arrow by ziggy General Audiences
Thranduil strikes a bargain with his fiery neighbour. Smaug is dead and Esgaroth is devastated. Legolas fights to sav his...
Forever is never that far away by mangacrack Teen
"It won't stop," Elrohir says one day, surrounded by a band of dead Orcs. "Why it won't stop?"
Holding up the Sky by mangacrack General Audiences
[Maedhros & Aragorn] The meeting of two wary souls, comforting each other.
The Lost Princess by Alpanu Teen
Your life path had been difficult. You do not have a family nor a place you could call "home". You consider yourself to be...
The Trespasser by Linda Hoyland General Audiences
A herb mistress has a fateful encounter with a stranger.
The song of tomorrow by Nuredhel Explicit
The past reaches out towards the future...A living mystery is being delivered to the king of Mirkwood as a gift and a strange...

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Shoutbox

Ysilme
03/30/17 01:32 am
I suppose they'd have a heart attack if I told them I'm writing fanfic in English these days. *g*
Ysilme
03/30/17 01:31 am
experience like you, Alpha, but with English: two English teachers told me I should try to get a job where I wouldn't need foreign languages as they judged me too little giftd in languages.
Ysilme
03/30/17 01:29 am
My father was a maths teacher, too, which wasn't always easy for me, *g* - my classmates considered it as uncool in a major way to be daugther of a maths teacher. And I made a similar
ziggy
03/28/17 11:13 pm
Wow- Naledi- you were Maths!! I am an English teacher and so agree. I am so careful - don't always get it right but try to make sure every interaction is positive.
Naledi
03/28/17 12:10 pm
I was a maths teacher too! A really soul-destroying job sometimes, because many children arrived at school already afraid of the subject.
Naledi
03/28/17 12:08 pm
It is sad how a bad teacher can make a child's time at school a misery. When I was teaching I was very conscious that even the most casual, throwaway comment could wound.
Alpha Ori
03/28/17 01:08 am
Love to meet him today and tell him I studied astronomy. Twit.
Alpha Ori
03/28/17 01:07 am
I still remember my maths teacher. Pasty faced and smelled of onions. I was traumatised, especially when he told my parents the only thing I was good at was sports.
Spiced Wine
03/24/17 02:30 pm
Most of my teachers were lovely - there were just a couple that were not nice.
ziggy
03/22/17 11:06 pm
I hate hearing about teachers who ruined a child's interest or confidence or curiosity- as a teacher myself, it actually hurts to think how someone has done that. It doesn't happen much now.
Shout Archive



Name: PoppyMarie (Signed) · Date: March 05, 2017 18:37 · For: Chapter 8 ~ The Veil ~

This was a magnificent chapter, your imagery is so powerful! I love how you've expanded this universe, Eru is very intriguing, I'm not quite sure what to think of him. He is neither good nor bad, he just IS. His relationship to Melkor was unexpected too, but it makes sense, given how Melkor feels about him. Eru's comparison of the way he feels about Melkor to the way Vanimórë feels about his father was interesting, it seems there are some emotions there that Van just won't let himself feel.

Vanimórë's anger was expected, and not unjustified, with all that he has lived through and seen, it would be hard to accept that someone with the power to do so would not intervene. It seems that even with his new abilities, he still feels powerless. I wonder, does he begin to suspect anything of Elgalad? I know that he does not realize what he is by the end of Dark God, but is there a suspicion yet? 

This was spectacular writing, the last image blew me away! Thank you, this was truly incredible! 



Author's Response: Thank you so much, Poppy :) And yes, Eru is -- just *is* -- at this moment, anyhow! Of course he would see Van's unresolved issues with Sauron, and understand them, too. And of course Van would be angry - if you met the creator of the universe wouldn't you be? But Eru himself is bound or at least too powerful to intervene. I think re; Elgalad, Van, due to what Fëanor said, is more thinking that Elgalad is not hiding some vast unhuman secret, but rather just hiding himself, because he thinks Van prefers him the way he appears. So Van got thrown off track a bit, there. I am so very pleased that you liked this chapter, as it was quite an 'epic' moment to try and write :)


Name: ziggy (Signed) · Date: March 05, 2017 9:08 · For: Chapter 8 ~ The Veil ~

I needed to have a day to think about this- sat up in the field and thought about the incredible change in perception you have wrought in this one powerful chapter. From Eru-Allfather (a patriarchal benevolent figure of the semitic tradition as Tolkien's) to this...almost impossible to comprehend, sci-fi ( and I mean that as a huge compliment) being that transcends the physical- is in another diemnsion simply and has created this world from thought - I love the sense of metatext here with Eru almost in the postion of writer with the power to create worlds and characters and destroy them- although obviously not 'real'. But there is a strange familiarity to Eru- and I have a sneaky suspicion. The fact that Morgoth is from Eru's own self and cast out is a really interesting variration on the God-Devil theme and chimes nicely with Jungian analysis- I like this idea you have threading all the way through of opposite and facets of new archtypes (because I do feel that you have created new archetypes- they FEEL immense and true in that way).

 

I mean this comment, so apt for the way we think these days and did not in Tolkien's:“None of those I have chosen are good men.” There was a wry smile in the tone. “Good men are apt to see only in black and white, and thou knowest the world is not that simple. Thou art not a good man, no, but a great one. As are the others.”

There are some wonderful give-aways too to keep readers susepended:Thou art not going to fail,” Eru murmured. “Not at the last.” 

 

One has a sense of Vanimore as part of Eru in the way that Morgoth is (and you've had the Christ- motif throughout albeit ambiguous and complex and hammered it home in the last sentence.)

 

I think the progress through the chapter is hugely impressive stylistically, gradual understnading although there is still enough oblique reference to make me wonder and ponder and grrr with frustration at not quite grasping everyhting- in the way VAnimore does not quite grasp everything yet.

 

Philosophically awesome chapter. Stylistically superb.

 



Author's Response: I like this idea you have threading all the way through of opposite and facets of new archtypes (because I do feel that you have created new archetypes- they FEEL immense and true in that way).

Oh, gosh – wow. Although I didn't intend any of this, I'm amazed that you think this – and pleased. What writer wouldn't be? My ideas about Eru were never going to be like Tolkien's, anyhow. Although this idea – of Eru – grew through the years.

I think the progress through the chapter is hugely impressive stylistically, gradual understanding although there is still enough oblique reference to make me wonder and ponder and grrr with frustration at not quite grasping everything- in the way Vanimórë does not quite grasp everything yet.

That was deliberate, because there still has to be the final end, which I hope will leave at least one final unaswerable question. Wow, thank you for such wonderful compliments, Ziggy. You have made my day :)


Name: Yseult (Signed) · Date: March 05, 2017 6:23 · For: Chapter 8 ~ The Veil ~
Beautifully written! It’s as if, every time a though comes up here or there, you take it and tie all the loose ends together into one epic scene.

Now you have me want to sit down with you in front of a fire, sipping a glass of hot wine and discuss all the endless possibilities of thought and the seemingly vastness of the universe!

I was wondering, if Sauron, or better Mairon in this case, has visited the Timeless Halls in hunger for knowledge and demanding answers in the same way. I see a strong resemblance in father and son here. And I can well imagine them having such conversations in one of their oddly “peaceful” moments together.

Another thought came to me. What if the love and yearning Vanimórë feels for his father could be another reason why he keeps his distance with Fëanor and his elven heritage? The subconscious shame for wanting someone who has brought such pain and destruction to his mother’s people?

Author's Response: Aww thank you, Yseult - I should love to have a chat with you :)

I did mention in a previous chapter that Sauron/Mairon did come here, it was where he met Melkor.

I think you are quite spot on with Van's motives and hidden feelings (not hidden to Eru) about his father; their relationship is extremely complicated. Thank you so much :)


Name: Starfox (Signed) · Date: March 03, 2017 20:15 · For: Chapter 8 ~ The Veil ~
Wow, very well written. Intense descriptions. It's like you are painting pictures with your words.

It's unnerving how powerful Eru is. I hope in this universe Vanimórë has a chance at happiness at it isn't Elgalad who is used to seal the Void.

Author's Response: Thank you so much, Starfox :) And for your kind words. I am so glad you enjoyed it! Oh Eru is incredibly powerful yes -- but not infallible!


Name: Yseult (Signed) · Date: February 25, 2017 6:41 · For: Chapter 7 ~ The Eve of Departure ~
Oh, Spiced, this is just fantastic!
I have been looking forward to Vanimórë and Celebrimbor having this conversation about their shared past for a long, long time!

There are so many hidden layers in this dialogue - the things left unsaid, and still such a deep understanding. I keep reading it again and again!

Yes, and I do hope Celebrimbor will be seeing Sauron again! Can't wait to read what all that "unfinished business" will entail... ;)

And then! Fëanor and Vanimórë. Brilliant!
This chapter is so "rich" in the way you handle the interpersonal relations between these very dominant characters. I honestly don't know where to start (and end) commenting.

It pains me to see Van's reaction when being touched with affection. He cannot give into it, or even accept it. However, if Maglor were the one giving him such affection openly (and being witnessed) how would Van react to that?

Very interesting is, that even though Vanimórë himself realized that Elgalad's behaviour changed (when confronting Dana), he doesn't seem to want to dig deeper into this. He is not a person who usually deceives himself, but Elgalad is his weak point.
It would be interesting to see, if he dares to confront Elgalad about it?

When it comes to Fëanor, I was thinking, that we sometimes forget how "young" (not only in years but also in experience) he was when the events in Valinor happened. He seems much more mature now - but without loosing his fire (grateful for that!)!
I very much enjoy how your characters develop and grow with their experiences - brilliant writing! You are really talented!

I wish, I had more time to review and discuss. I am so curious about all the ongoing story lines...
What happened to Finrod and Celegorm after their one-year marriage? And is Orodreth still with his brother? Has Bainalph ever met and talked to the queen? What about Maglin?
My brain is on fire when reading your stories :D
Can't wait for any updates!

Author's Response: Thank you so much, Yseult. I am so glad you liked this. I did think about how Van would react to Maglor, but at this moment, Maglor wouldn't open himself like this to Van, so …

Van did 'sort of' question Elgalad after that episode, but he got so much non-reaction that he felt guilty, I suppose and didn't push it.

I expect we will address the other issues you spoke of in later chapters :) Thank you so much again!


Name: ebbingnight (Signed) · Date: February 09, 2017 16:54 · For: Chapter 7 ~ The Eve of Departure ~
To me, it seems that "love" means "possession" to Sauron, though he values some "possessions" much more highly than others, as they come much closer to being "like" himself than anyone else: Celebrimor and Van. And, accordingly, if his "possessions" don't submit as he sees fit, he will attempt to make them do so rather than ever letting go. But I don't want to think about this too much, as it suddenly brings up numerous uncomfortable parallels, both in your 'verse and ours.

Author's Response: You are very right, Ebbingnight! Thank you for the comment :)


Name: PoppyMarie (Signed) · Date: February 06, 2017 17:20 · For: Chapter 7 ~ The Eve of Departure ~

This was great! I loved all of the interactions here, there was so much to process.

So Mairon did love Celebrimbor, or at least as close to love as he feels, and Celebrimbor felt the same. I am greatly looking forward to when they meet again, I expect it will be quite the showdown!

I so want Van to accept the love Fëanor is trying to give him, I know he won't, at least for a while, but I dearly hope he will learn to accept it at some point. I cannot imagine how Van resists Fëanor as much as he does, but he is incredibly good at denying himself. They were both rather open and honest here, which was interesting to see, I can't wait for more interactions between them! 

Amazing as always, thank you so much for all your hard work!!!



Author's Response: Thank you so much for commenting, Poppy Marie. I think, even though Van would not admit it, there is enough of the Fëanorion in him to 'open' a little to Fëanor. All that family are very honest with one another, in general, and I believe Van would love to feel accepted and enclosed by Fëanor, he just will not allow himself to be, as yet. Because in a way, he's right, he is not of the temperament to be 'quiet' (none of them are, really) and he was raised for war and command. He knows what he is good at and is going to do it.

We shall see more of Celebrimbor and Annatar in flashbacks too, I suspect :)


Name: Starfox (Signed) · Date: February 05, 2017 23:10 · For: Chapter 6 ~ Stars That Bloom On The Edge Of Night ~
Wow, that was intense. The way Gothmog was annihilated was unexpected. Very intense scene.

Author's Response: Thank you very much, Starfox :) I am glad you enjoyed that chapter.


Name: Yseult (Signed) · Date: January 22, 2017 14:43 · For: Chapter 6 ~ Stars That Bloom On The Edge Of Night ~
Oh, Spiced, thank you so much! After a busy, busy week with no time to read or review, this chapter is such a treat!
It's like the hidden spark of a smouldering fire... and I just imagine what would happen, if Fëanor and Fingolfin would allow the flames to burn high!

Fëanor is not the type of man to hide his thoughts or feelings, but yes, he is learning, and sharing his pain and fear is just such an intimate (trustful) moment. The doubt whether his brother still is in love with him or not (oh yes!), this tender insecurity... beautiful!

The admittance of hurt at Fingolfin's repudiation, but also acknowledging his own betrayal, the reflections on their time together in Valinor - these scenes give me so much to think about. Their relationship has such a depth, and I am tempted to shout in Turgon's face "Who are you to judge them!"
(Thank you so much for your thoughts on Turgon in your response to my other review. Yes, love does show - and so does jealousy. Both can be such strong drivers in a relationship, good or bad...)

I am surprised that the Ithiledhil will remove to New Cuiviénen (since they are not only of the Noldor), but I am sure Edenel has his reasons to lead them there, eventhough it might provoke some uncomfortable questions about their past.
However, I am worried about Bainalph (Edenel and the Ithiledhil were such a support to him). His relationship with Thranduil remains unresolved (how has Thranduil treated him the past 15 years, I wonder?), he does not seem to be really healed from his soul-wound, and his strength as a leader of his people will be needed in the war to come. I fear, he will be living only for his duty to his people... in this Bainalph and Thranduil are not so unalike, it seems.

That reminds me, I have to go back to the previous chapters to review! I must admit, I do have a soft spot for complicated relations - and there are plenty where Fëanorions are involved ;)

Again, thank you so much for making my day, Spiced! Can't wait for the next update!

Author's Response: Awww, thank you so much for your review, Yseult. I hope you have had a restful weekend after being so busy.

I think it's easy for us to forget Fëanor has doubts and vulnerabilities – but he does, and I thought this a good chance to explore them a little. I mean, both these half-brothers do, but they have recognizable 'public' faces that seem (in different ways) to have no weaknesses.

Fëanor wants to create a world, a society where his relationship with Fingolfin doesn't matter; he's beginning to see now that this will not be easy; somehow the Noldor have to transcend their old selves and the old laws. Fingolfin in many ways is more politically savvy and has a lot more experience, and has always known Fëanor could lose the Noldor completely if he does not tread softly. And perhaps Fëanor wouldn't even care that much, save that he wants to lead the Noldor against Morgoth – all of them, and not just for himself, but for every man, woman and child who suffered. And that's after he's dealt with the Valar (for the same reasons).

The Ithiledhil will follow Edenel because he's been their captain from the first, and there in the East there are still Elves around that are not Noldor (Elúred and Elúrin and Daeron used to have some contact with them when they lived there) so it's not like they'll be stranded among the Noldor, although, like Edenel they really think of themselves as a separate people now. But yes, there is the problem with Bainalph. I think in the last years, he and Thranduil have maintained a very 'formal' relationship. Thranduil's wife is back, and Bainalph is not getting involved in that situation again! And he cannot really leave the Wood, or cart all his people off somewhere else. I will have to come back to Bainalph as this is an unresolved situation, (deliberately so) but sadly not all situations are easily resolved.

Thank you so much again. I am very pleased you enjoyed this chapter :)


Name: PoppyMarie (Signed) · Date: January 12, 2017 18:07 · For: Chapter 6 ~ Stars That Bloom On The Edge Of Night ~

Wow, this chapter was so wonderful to read! The contrast between Fëanor and Fingolfin sharing a quiet moment and the incomprehensible display of power from Eru, it was just gripping to read. 

Fëanor and Fingolfin so rarely have a moment that isn't filled with tension, it was nice to see them just talking and comforting eachother. Fëanor reminiscing on their early relationship and understanding that he was "in love" was interesting, back then it's like he always knew what he felt and didn't need to put a label on the feeling, and now even through it all, he's still in love. This scene has it all, the desire, the pain, and the all-consuming love. Absolutely beautiful!

The descriptions of Eru and the Timeless Halls are perfect, they capture the beauty and power so well, and the unmaking that Eru demonstrated here was a terrifying reminder that he has powers beyond comprehension. The juxtaposition between his merciless judgement of Gothmog, and holding out his hand to Urphiel was powerful imagery. 

This chapter was stunning, gorgeous, so well written it makes me want to cry! I've read it twice so far, and I'll read it again, I don't know what drew me into this one so much, but all I can say is well done! Thank you! 



Author's Response: Fëanor and Fingolfin so rarely have a moment that isn't filled with tension, it was nice to see them just talking and comforting eachother. Fëanor reminiscing on their early relationship and understanding that he was "in love" was interesting, back then it's like he always knew what he felt and didn't need to put a label on the feeling, and now even through it all, he's still in love. This scene has it all, the desire, the pain, and the all-consuming love. Absolutely beautiful!

Oh, thank you so much, Poppy Marie. I am so glad you liked that. I didn't start writing with that scene in mind; it just happened. I think Fingolfin has so rarely seen Fëanor sad (save for his mad grief when Finwë was killed) that he was genuinely concerned, and Fëanor felt that. It was past time for him to realise how much he had been (and still was) in love, because his feelings have been so wrapped up in the proprietorial 'he's mine' attitude, and desire,and conflict, that it's genuinely possible he never thought of being completely in love. And no doubt Fingolfin does feel the same but statesmanship and politics have come between them even more than they did in Valinor.

The descriptions of Eru and the Timeless Halls are perfect, they capture the beauty and power so well, and the unmaking that Eru demonstrated here was a terrifying reminder that he has powers beyond comprehension. The juxtaposition between his merciless judgement of Gothmog, and holding out his hand to Urphiel was powerful imagery. 

I think many people (even the 'gods' the story) kind of associated Eru with eternal kindness and forgiveness, only to now discover that he can be merciless and yes, is incomprehensibly powerful. Even Melkor cannot unmake things.

This chapter was stunning, gorgeous, so well written it makes me want to cry! I've read it twice so far, and I'll read it again, I don't know what drew me into this one so much, but all I can say is well done! Thank you! 

Wow, no thank you for liking it so much! I am thrilled you did :)


Name: ebbingnight (Signed) · Date: January 12, 2017 5:53 · For: Chapter 6 ~ Stars That Bloom On The Edge Of Night ~
This is me, clicking back to the chapter repeatedly and thinking about whether Mairon feels this as well as Melkor, and what it might mean. And, oddly, I think I can better understand now why he left to follow Melkor. Very unsettling indeed, seeing the Unmaking.

Author's Response: Thank you for commenting, Ebbingnight :)

thinking about whether Mairon feels this as well as Melkor, and what it might mean. And, oddly, I think I can better understand now why he left to follow Melkor. Very unsettling indeed, seeing the Unmaking.

I think he would have – I think every-one in the Void would have. I also think an Unmaking is extremely unusual – it might never have happened before, even.


Name: Anamia (Signed) · Date: January 11, 2017 19:16 · For: Chapter 6 ~ Stars That Bloom On The Edge Of Night ~
It's so good to see Feanor is finaly reaching few conclussions.

Author's Response: Thank you, Anamia :) I did enjoy writing that :) And I agree!


Name: Caunedhiel (Signed) · Date: January 10, 2017 23:31 · For: Chapter 6 ~ Stars That Bloom On The Edge Of Night ~
Oooo the ending made me shiver there... I bet even melkor is feeling scared hiding in the void! I wonder if that will be the end for him as well! Will have to see :)

Thank you for another lovely chapter, you always surprise and your characters are so fleshed out and believable especially the ones that aren't really mentioned all that much in cannon! I wish my imagination was as good as yours sian!

Author's Response: Thank you so much :) I am glad you liked? (sort of) The ending, Caunedhiel :) I don't know that will happen to Melkor, ultimately – he's part of the universe, after all, but too destructive to be allowed free rein. Although no doubt in some universes he is free. I'm very into the Multiverse theory, :D

I think every-one's imagination is absolutely the same. It's just a matter of usage. Stories grow out of stories, so the more you write, the more you push your mind, and the more you push your mind outward, the more ideas seem to come in. Or that seems to be the way it works with me. I didn't plan it all out ten years ago, well – some of it, but not all. It seems to be as simple as that. Like exercising a muscle?


Name: Yseult (Signed) · Date: January 09, 2017 13:55 · For: Chapter 1 ~ Into The Shadows ~
Thank *you*, Spiced!
I am so glad, if - by reviewing - I can give you something in return for all the pleasure you give me by sharing your stories! Well, I wouldn't mind paying you for reading them, but... ;)

Turgon. I have to admit, I find his character rather interesting. He does not seem to be intimidated by either Fëanor nor Fingolfin, but whatever his motives, I do believe, he cares about his father (maybe his defiance can partly be interpreted as being protective of him?) I am wondering what will become of their relationship in the future...

Again, thank you so much for writing and sharing your thoughts in the reviews as well :)

Author's Response: I think Turgon has never (probably will never) get over his jealousy that his brother was besotted by a Fëanorion and that his father also was. (Because he was not stupid, I am sure he had an inkling of his father's relationship with Fëanor in Valinor) I believe he is wary of Fëanor rather than frightened at least now, in this new life where he's not insane or mad with grief.

He'll never really forgive the Fëanorions for their abandonment in Araman, because he considers they indirectly killed his wife, and he's not at all happy with the flagrant overturning of the Valars laws, not because he had any love for the Valar, (or is even particularly against same-sex love) but because it's so different to the rather stern society he ruled in Gondolin. It was just easier to carry on with them. The only people there (in Gondolin) who dared to openly flout the laws were Glorfindel and Ecthelion and even they were not too obvious. And they were extremely important; he couldn't really turn them out; they were his lieutenants.

I think there is an element of protectiveness in his relationship with his father, considering what happened last time. Never trust a Fëanorion! But if Fingolfin were publicly exposed as being in an incestuous relationship, and the people revolted against it, it might serve him. He's used to ruling. He's ambitious – in canon he was one of the most keen to leave Valinor. Yet it would also besmirch him, he thinks, because he's Fingolfin's son. At the moment, he would just rather recreate Gondolin, rule there and forget about the others.
I am sure he loves his father, but does not understand him. I think, with Fingon entranced by Maedhros from a young age, he also was quite a lonely child, and moved to create his own household when he was fairly young. Not that Fingolfin neglected him, either, or any of his children, but it was probably clear to Turgon that his father had some 'interest' that was not his children or his wife. You do know. I remember when I was a child, my mum when she was having an affair – it was secret, but she was 'different' excited, head-in-the-clouds, thoughts elsewhere, like a fire was lit inside her. I am pretty sure that even though Fingolfin tried to hide his feelings, they did show to some-one observant. Fingon, spellbound as he was, didn't care, Turgon did.

It is so marvelous to have comments, and know you are being supported, I can't explain it, but I am so thrilled you decided to comment :) Thank you!


Name: Yseult (Signed) · Date: January 03, 2017 3:38 · For: Chapter 1 ~ Into The Shadows ~
Dear Spiced, thank you for sharing your wonderful talent with us!

I have to admit, I have been ghost reading your stories for a long time. But 2017 is the year, I decided not to be silent anymore and start reviewing ;)

Your stories give me so much joy day after day, your characters are real in their complexity, stunning in their actions and reactions, and the world you draw is deep and rich, tragic and painful. A selfish request... but please, do never stop writing!

That said, I actually don't know where to start, lol! There is so much to comment on - and so much to explore (I keep re-reading your stories while waiting for updates, and there is always something new to find).

With the death of Coldagnir, this chapter has indeed a touch of "finality" thinking about where this will lead to. But as in all good story telling, you manage to keep us on the edge of our seats, unable to avert our eyes to the inevitable.

I especially enjoyed the little "sparring" between Fëanor and Fingolfin in the beginning. They will never be able to resist each other. I guess, with all the grief and pent-up energy after this battle, Fëanor will try to make another move on Fingolfin?

I am also wondering what Van feels about the quick death of The Mouth. Relieve? Or even a certain betrayal that the Mouth did not "suffer" enough (as payment for all the cruelties he has inflicted on others?)

Thank you for this wonderful New Year gift - can't wait to see where this is leading to in the next chapter!

Author's Response: Aww, gosh, Yseult, thank you so much for your kindness. It's a glorious treat, getting a new reviewer. I can't tell you how much it means when some-one decides to review! :) I am so very glad you've been enjoying the stories :)

Your stories give me so much joy day after day, your characters are real in their complexity, stunning in their actions and reactions, and the world you draw is deep and rich, tragic and painful. A selfish request... but please, do never stop writing!

Oooh. Thank you! That is such an encouragement! To know your characters seem real to the readers is just...amazing! I only write them, and what they do.

Other people have said this chapter brings a flavour of endings to the story, but while this is truly where the Noldor begin to strike back, there's really few wars to get involved in at the moment, so it will not all be doom and gloom and battle. Of course it will end at Dagor Dagorath. But time-wise, as n years/centuries that will not be for a long time.

I was so sad to lose Coldagnir (not that he is really, utterly lost) but he did make a vow long ago, which he has fulfilled, so I hope there is a sense of completion, too.

I think Fëanor would definitely want to spend some time with Fingolfin, but it's not all that easy in their current situation. Not that Fëanor is banned from Fingolfin's camp or anything, it's just as very high-profile people they can't really move without it being remarked on, (and also Turgon is here, who'll be watching them like a hawk, along with others of his people) so Fëanor will probably have to rein in his needs for a time.

Van wanted to kill the mouth, oh wow, yes, but he was willing to cede the honour to Túrin. It was (if you like) a way of giving him confidence, making him feel as if he had accomplished something in this new life. Van could have destroyed him, and it would certainly have been satisfying, but this symmetry, of Túrin destroying a great evil, is part of his story, and so Van stepped back for him.

Again, thank you so much for your encouragement. It was such a treat to find this review :)


Name: ebbingnight (Signed) · Date: January 03, 2017 2:00 · For: Chapter 5 ~ Fire-eater~
We should not be sorry that Urphiel went out in what was quite literally a blaze of glory, and made as much of a requital as he possibly could for what he'd done as Coldagnir. He's one of the very few characters who have made any attempts at redemption for their previous actions (others that come to mind are Celegorm, Maeglin, Maglor and, of course, Van himself) and he is, I think, the most successful, in that the only way that he could really defeat his foe was by taking him, not just into death, but even beyond the Eternal Dark, into the Timeless Halls themselves. (And, of course, Urphiel would have to "recollect" himself greatly in order to be able to do that.) This was not just a "good" death such as Maeglin has contemplated; this was a truly necessary sacrifice.

I don't think we've seen the last of Coldagnir/Urphiel (though I suspect he may be almost unrecognizable, given that we don't know, and probably can't comprehend, his "truest, oldest" form. But we will, again, love him when we do, I venture to guess. This was a gorgeously satisfying chapter, to know that Gothmog at least was appropriately "coffined" at last, and to hear Daeron and Maglor sing Coldagnir home to the Timeless Halls.

Author's Response: I think, the most successful, in that the only way that he could really defeat his foe was by taking him, not just into death, but even beyond the Eternal Dark, into the Timeless Halls themselves. (And, of course, Urphiel would have to "recollect" himself greatly in order to be able to do that.) This was not just a "good" death such as Maeglin has contemplated; this was a truly necessary sacrifice.

I'm so glad you think of it this way, Ebbingnight, because this is what I thought myself. Urphiel knew he could not defeat Melkor, but he could do something to the foe who had been on his neck for so very long, even before he came to Utumno.

Some of those who gave themselves missions failed, but in the end, Urphiel did not. It was vengeance, of course, but also he was thinking of the others who had suffered at Gothmog's hands, and died, of all the destruction he'd wrought, and that – as Coldagnir – he himself had a part in (Fëanor's death, the Dagor Bragollach, Fingon's death, the fall of Gondolin) .
He wanted to make restitution for his acts and not only by words, but also actions: and to take Gothmog out of the picture wholly, as he was one of Morgoth's strongest servants. Until Angmar, until they guessed that 'something' would try and break through from the Dark, and that (because Melkor couldn't, it would likely be Gothmog, who would try to possess Coldagnir) he didn't know how he would be able to do this. But he was able to, in the end. And so he did.

Only Elgalad knows all of it, and that Urphiel has indeed taken Gothmog's soul to Eru, who can 'unmake' it, (the only being that can do that). But I hope we do see him again, as himself.

Thank you so much for such an understanding and thoughtful review :)


Name: Caunedhiel (Signed) · Date: January 02, 2017 18:34 · For: Chapter 5 ~ Fire-eater~
Such a fantastic chapter! I really loved the idea of coldagnir eating gothmogs fea, there is something very primeval about it and fits really well in the story! I really hope he did go back to the timeless halls he really deserves to although I am sad to lose him :( this story feels very epic and I'm looking forward to the next chapter ! :) many thanks for the update xx

Author's Response: Thank you so much Caunedhiel. :) I am so glad that the soul-eating felt primeval, as my 'gods' are not really 'tamed'. If you see what I mean.
Yes, I will write more of Coldagnir and Gothmog's fate later, because Coldagnir did fulfil the mission he set upon himself. I was very sad to lose him, too :(

Thank you so much for your support, and your kind words :) I do appreciate your taking the time!


Name: ziggy (Signed) · Date: December 21, 2016 16:01 · For: Chapter 4 ~ Storm Front ~

This is becoming EPIC on GLOBAL proportions!!! It's like the battle between the Olympians and the Titans! Now Coldagnir is revealed as having some greater power/ quality like Elgalad - that is really intriguing. (I love Coldagnir0 his shame at being seduced and opporessed, his blazing love) I really like the Assyrian/Hittite sound of his name so it reaches far back. Urphiel. Great idea!

 

I am aware too, that you and I are writing stories with similar themes- of 'evil' manifestions from the Dark. A fascinating subject so I am reading closely, thingking, savouring each thought- such detail and such philosophical density. I love that you never compromise and keep true to your tale- with all the shades of grey in terms of right and wrong- such a counterpoint to Tolkien himself, who was always relatively back/white.

 

I love the way you write elves- in your verse they are so much more- ancient and wise, deep - this description of Beleg I htink, is a wonderful piece of writing and exemplifies the way you write elves - they are completely Other, in an indefinable way, and still similar,

 

He went into Beleg's arms, touched the roots of trees that had grown in times so ancient, so distant, he could find no name for them. He tasted minerals buried deep in the earth, felt the cold roar of winter rivers storming down from mountains whose heights lost themselves in cloud. He felt the pattern of sunlight upon bare skin, heard the deep silence of unnamed forests, caught his breath as an arrow sang from a black bow into the eye of a stag. Tasted blood and desire and dewfall like wine. Within Beleg's embrace he forgot his curse, his doom, forgot his parents, his sisters, both of them, forgot Doriath and Nargothrond and all his life. Beleg was everything he wanted, everything he was ashamed of wanting. And he was here, and alive, alive, alive. 

 

It was like coming home. 

 

Sensuous and beautiul writing.



Author's Response: Now Coldagnir is revealed as having some greater power/ quality like Elgalad - that is really intriguing. (I love Coldagnir his shame at being seduced and oppressed, his blazing love) I really like the Assyrian/Hittite sound of his name so it reaches far back. Urphiel. Great idea!

Coldagnir was talking to Elgalad in the gardens in Imladris, back in the last story; they're both hiding what they are, although not from each other, although Elgalad does not tell him everything. Elgalad's 'mission' is Vanimórë, Coldagnir/Urphiel's was Melkor, but he 'almost' got swallowed up. I don't think any of the 'gods' realised how powerful Melkor was in the beginning. And that he was 'more' than one of them, though Eru did try and explain it to Mairon.

I am aware too, that you and I are writing stories with similar themes- of 'evil' manifestations from the Dark. A fascinating subject so I am reading closely, thinking, savouring each thought- such detail and such philosophical density. I love that you never compromise and keep true to your tale- with all the shades of grey in terms of right and wrong- such a counterpoint to Tolkien himself, who was always relatively back/white.

Oh, thank you. You do that, too. Well, I am not much of a one for compromise; not in writing, at least, where any kind of restraint or restriction is repugnant to me, and the characters have to act like they actually 'are' without my trying to impose my moral imperatives on them. It would be very dull if one side were all shining white and the other black as pitch. It's like they say, even the villains never see themselves as villainous. They have reasons for their actions.

It's like your Elrohir; he's definitely not a 'white knight', he's so complex, dark, racked by memories and actions, but because of that he's fascinating!

I love the way you write elves- in your verse they are so much more- ancient and wise, deep - this description of Beleg I htink, is a wonderful piece of writing and exemplifies the way you write elves - they are completely Other, in an indefinable way, and still similar,

Beleg is Unbegotten, and I have always thought of him as feeling very 'other' and ancient, (although not looking ancient) very much an element of nature, almost, (and not like the Noldor or Fëanor who are like fire) but also human enough to fall in love with Túrin.

Aww, thank you so much for your lovely comments, Ziggy! They made my day! My reviews have dropped off a cliff on here, and I feel so devastated. But I have to keep plodding on, just to finish for myself, even if I end up with no-one reading it at all.


Name: PoppyMarie (Signed) · Date: December 18, 2016 7:11 · For: Chapter 4 ~ Storm Front ~

Oh my goodness! It's the Mairon backstory, (or at lest some of it) that I've been waiting for!

I can now further understand Mairon's desire of order, and desire to rule what he believes is his, he came from the fires of the earth, it's only natural he would think of it as his. And he voluntarily went to Melkor to try and balance him but got drawn in, and I can see why, Melkor is terrifyingly magnificent. Am I reading it correctly and understanding that Melkor knew this but did not consider it a threat? I wonder what his original plan was for Vanimórë facing Melkor? He was always shaping a warrior to defy him, but with Vanimórë's ascension a god, those plans must have been thrown off. Did some part of Mairon know, consciously or unconsciously, that it would happen? I have so many new questions, I do hope we will get more backstory for both. Melkor and Mairon. 

 

And I'm a tad worried about this sacrifice thing for closing the void, and if Coldagnir's upcoming battle will have anything to do with it! I'm looking forward to seeing what's next! Thank you for sharing! :)




Author's Response: I can now further understand Mairon's desire of order, and desire to rule what he believes is his, he came from the fires of the earth, it's only natural he would think of it as his. And he voluntarily went to Melkor to try and balance him but got drawn in, and I can see why, Melkor is terrifyingly magnificent. Am I reading it correctly and understanding that Melkor knew this but did not consider it a threat?

Yes, this is why he could utilize the fires of Orodruin, tame them, use them; why he could create the Ring and other things, his facility with metals, minerals, even shapeshifting, all the Earth itself is part of him. No wonder he considered it his!
But Melkor was, well...Melkor, and no he did not consider Sauron a threat, probably he thought it amusing that Sauron believed he could 'temper' him in any way, but back then he did see how incredibly useful Sauron could be to him. He was ambitious, powerful and very clever, and not afflicted by morality.

I wonder what his original plan was for Vanimórë facing Melkor? He was always shaping a warrior to defy him, but with Vanimórë's ascension a god, those plans must have been thrown off. Did some part of Mairon know, consciously or unconsciously, that it would happen? I have so many new questions, I do hope we will get more backstory for both. Melkor and Mairon. 

When Melkor came back from Valinor with the prophecy of the Dagor Dagorath, I think Mairon began to think then, of a warrior who could face him, drive him back into the Void, forever. When Fingolfin met Melkor in battle and wounded him, Mairon saw that it could be done, that Melkor was vulnerable. He'd already seen Edenel and the White Slayers long before, and saw their potential, but they broke free. A son of his blood would be bound to him. (Not to Melkor, although he persuaded Melkor that it was almost the same thing).
Oh, he still thinks Van will do it, he'll have to as Melkor has already said Van must be destroyed – he's too powerful, too much of a threat.
Yes, there will undoubtedly be more back story :)

The 'sacrifice' can't happen yet, not until after the Last Battle.

Thank you so much, Poppy Marie :)


Name: ebbingnight (Signed) · Date: December 18, 2016 4:49 · For: Chapter 4 ~ Storm Front ~
Although Sauron's reflections are frightening (one tends to forget what a psychopath he is when transfixed by him in person), this does illuminate something I'd wondered about. Did he have to drive Móriel mad quickly in order to impregnate her and keep her alive long enough to bear a child before she succumbed to shock and grief like her predecessors in his "experiments," and this horrific murder with her as witness was the quickest way to that end? The extreme cruelty of what was done seems very calculated, and Sauron seldom does anything without a plan. This atrocity (horrendous as it is) actually worked well enough, along with Sauron's other sorcery in keeping her unsure of what was reality and what was not... until she escaped into death, but left her twins behind. What Sauron doesn't foresee is that Móriel's blood, for whatever reason, somehow protects Sauron's son from inheriting the sociopathic selfishness of his Maian father. Ironic, since the Fëanorians don't even know she carried their blood, and she also loved a man who, instead, loved Fingolfin. A strange, sad part of the story, that both she and Vanya are essentially invisible but have done as much as Sauron in making Van what he is. I tend to think also that there's something as yet unknown in Móriel's inability to wake from her long sleep. If she were to wake, what might be revealed that we don't know?

Author's Response: The extreme cruelty of what was done seems very calculated, and Sauron seldom does anything without a plan. This atrocity (horrendous as it is) actually worked well enough, along with Sauron's other sorcery in keeping her unsure of what was reality and what was not... until she escaped into death, but left her twins behind. What Sauron doesn't foresee is that Móriel's blood, for whatever reason, somehow protects Sauron's son from inheriting the sociopathic selfishness of his Maian father.

I think Sauron and Melkor had seen, by then, that if a woman was sane when these things happened to her, and being Elven, she'd probably 'choose' death rather than pregnancy. I am not one of those who believes all Elves died when raped, but I think they could choose to fade out of life, so Móriel, mad and confused and half thinking (or hoping) that it was her husband with her, whose children she was carrying, was easier to deal with.

Van inherited his ability to love from somewhere, yes. Not from his father, who found the concept difficult to understand, at least back then. Van adored his twin, and that left him with the ability to love, as well as the conviction that he did not deserve to be loved in return, because he killed her (or rather, has always been encouraged to think he did, and he thinks he did).

A strange, sad part of the story, that both she and Vanya are essentially invisible but have done as much as Sauron in making Van what he is. I

Yes, it is, sad, although if the story pivoted about them, rather than Van, I would have written about them, rather than him. To Sauron, they were just the left-over dross from his successful experiment, although he could see that Vanya would be more useful 'alive' and tied to him than dead and gone, because she might, one day, be useful as leverage, which she is going to be. She was, then, the one person Van would have done anything for; if he could have died for her he would, but it would not have helped her in Angband, simply left her alone. So as a lever...she's incredibly useful. As for Móriel...I often wonder (as I've not written it yet) how she would react to her children, if she feels anything at all, as she was not sane when carrying them, and there was not the same spiritual bond as there is between Elven mothers and their children.

Of course Van is going to meet them one day and not as he already has with his mother unconscious, and his sister carrying a curse, but further on from that.

Thank you so much for reading and commenting, Ebbingnight. :)


Name: PoppyMarie (Signed) · Date: December 11, 2016 3:40 · For: Chapter 3 _ In Unexpected Places, In Unexpected Faces ~

I'm so happy they made it! I was just waiting for them to get stopped, but I don't think Melkor is going to give up that easily. Now I suppose Túrin will have to deal with his feelings for Beleg and the lies Melkor put in his head. I wonder how their conversation will go now that Beleg knows it's really Túrin, and Túrin has his memories. 

Im glad they brought Marita with, she's pretty tough with everything she's lived through, and certainly didn't deserve to stay there. 

When Túrin almost killed Beleg it's as if history is repeating itself, only this time, things are turning out just a little different. Like the past is being rewritten, but only time will tell if things turn out better for them. 

Excited for more! Thank you so much! :)



Author's Response: Melkor won't give up, and in fact he's not, but he knows he can't use Malantur's body – he needs some-one on a par with himself. His semi-possession here is really because he can do it, and he's 'feeling' his way, wants the others to know that they've not heard the last of him.

So, yes, now Túrin has to try and deal with his emotions, which are complicated and tumultuous, and that won't be easy. As for Marita, I think it was an impulse of Túrin's to bring her, but not one she, she or anyone would regret.

When Túrin almost killed Beleg it's as if history is repeating itself, only this time, things are turning out just a little different. Like the past is being rewritten, but only time will tell if things turn out better for them.

An old tale has to be re-written, but not turn out quite the same way for them to triumph this time, or at least for the story not to turn out the same as before :)

Thank you so much for commenting, Poppy Marie :)


Name: ziggy (Signed) · Date: December 10, 2016 23:28 · For: Chapter 3 _ In Unexpected Places, In Unexpected Faces ~

Phew- you had me breathless on the edge of my seat here! Thank goodness he didn't kill Beleg again! I'm not 100% sure of Marita but they coudn't lave her there. 

 

The water splashed, icy against Beleg's legs, and he felt the spell unfurl like silk, saw the doeskin of his boots, felt the wind in his hair. 

 

love that image of the spell falling from them. 



Author's Response: Thank you, Ziggy :)

I think Marita was just an impulse of Túrin's to save any-one – as no human deserves to stay there, but I think she's just a normal woman who was strong enough to survive, and no spy or anything.


Name: ebbingnight (Signed) · Date: December 09, 2016 2:20 · For: Chapter 3 _ In Unexpected Places, In Unexpected Faces ~
Oh, that was perfectly planned, but of course Túrin wouldn't expect to be rescued by goblins! And they took Marita with them, so they can destroy the whole place now as far I am concerned.

Author's Response: I think they probably will now - or rather, I think there's going to be enough power unleashed to bring it down, whether they do or not. Thank you, Ebbingnight


Name: ebbingnight (Signed) · Date: December 01, 2016 0:01 · For: Chapter 2 ~ A Time To Take Risks ~
I have to confess that I rather like Marita: life below stairs in Angmar certainly isn't for the faint of heart or the slow of tongue! And I am STILL curious about the whereabouts of those bees used for the mead.

But all of that is perhaps merely my way of distracting myself from dwelling on how Túrin will face the future (assuming he does have one, as I have to believe that there WILL be a rescue) now that he knows his tragic past. Even ignoring Melkor's efforts to make everything seem even worse than it actually was, it's a heavy burden of regret and remorse for one so young, and (if he remains human) one with comparatively little time with which to come to terms with it. He's been dead for far longer than he's been alive, and now he has all those memories... and Melkor to face down.

Author's Response: Oh, Marita must be as hard as nails to have survived these years. She knows who to be wary of, and it's definitely not a few scummy goblins, lol. She's tough as whitleather. If any of the few humans in Angmar survive what's going to go down, I think she's be one of them.

And the bees, yes. Well old Grey Hair was right that the incomers don't know Angmar as well as the natives – and as Beleg conjectured there must be a way in and out of the fortress only a few know about.

He's been dead for far longer than he's been alive, and now he has all those memories... and Melkor to face down.

It is the worse possible time, place and opponent to face when hit with these memories. Melkor twisting them, Túrin's own deep-buried doubts, his regrets, his anger and shame. This is all piling through him, on top of the humiliation just heaped upon him. It will leave scars whatever happens. But no-one ever said he did not face his enemies with courage.

Thank you so much for reviewing, Ebbingnight :)


Name: PoppyMarie (Signed) · Date: November 29, 2016 6:31 · For: Chapter 2 ~ A Time To Take Risks ~

It's just getting better and better! I definitely felt like Beleg was close to losing it here, with all of the horror and degrading things Túrin has to endure, he is lucky Elgalad was there to stop him from doing something stupid. I hope that Túrin can see past the lies Melkor is feeding him, I can see how he has corrupted and fooled people before, he tells things that are clearly false, but have just a sliver of truth that causes doubt. Once the doubt is there, it eats away at the mind until you think it was your idea all along, and that is very dangerous. I hope Beleg will be able to shown Túrin how wrong Melkor is in the future. 

I read your responses to the other reviewers, as I always do because they think of things I haven't, and I noticed you talking about Sauron and his role later in the story. I'm interested to see what happens, especially after what went down in Moria in Dark God. He always seems to be playing the game to the very end, I can't wait to see what's in store and how Van will deal with him in the future.

This story already has me on the edge of my seat, I can't wait to see what's next! Thank you for your hard work! :)



Author's Response: Yes, that's Melkor; he can make you doubt your own feelings and motivations – a little truth mixed with lies makes them go down easier. Honey with poison. And Túrin does know this in his heart, but when faced with it, it's extremely difficult not to let it eat away at you.

I didn't mind talking about Sauron because it's not actually a spoiler, seeing as those stories were posted years ago. But yes – I believe all that went down in Moria was a game within a game, possibly played by two protagonists who knew each other so well they didn't even need to collude.

Sauron's 'death' was probably simply to take him out of the picture – for that time, but he cannot really die and certainly was not sent back to the Void, so he was around long after that. They had reached an impasse, as Van was not going to let him kill anyone, and was not going to let Sauron rule through him, so it was as if they came to an unspoken arrangement to draw a line under that 'act' and let the curtains fall over it.

When I posted part of Anvil (which was going to be the beginning, originally, but now it won't be, Sauron was in that, and that was long after the end of Dark God).

Thank you so much, Poppy Marie. I am glad you are liking it so far :)


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